The real struggle starts after a tyrant regime gone

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The real struggle starts after a tyrant regime gone,
all kinds of forces rush in to fill power-vacu​um, changes take back-seat

Ruby Amatulla

The real struggle to change a government and society starts after the tyrant is gone. That is when the power vacuum sets in, anarchy creeps in, and everybody start to move in to grab power. This is really a scary and worrisome time. History is a testament that a worse situations often arise after a regime change take place. It takes a lot more struggle, in-fighting, tug of wars between the old and new rivals, the society become fragmented, polarized and severely confrontational, and the outcome often is a compromise in which the people again are victimized.

This could be avoided now in many countries, like Egypt or Tunisia or other countries that would follow suit soon to get rid of their autocratic repressive regimes, by a fresh new approach.

In this intensely interdependent global society there are transnational civil society alliances that are powerful and giving enormous service to the needed societies  to address human rights violations, injustices, oppressions etc.

Today that format could be used to expand and use a comprehensive agenda and approach to help bring about a healthy transformation without the bloodshed and turmoil.

Any forceful change today could take place only when there is the support of the international community. That is how the Mubarak regime was ousted because of the enormous international presence and pressures created by the uprising Egyptians and the media exposure of that to get the overwhelming support of the world community.

However the problem is that to help change the governing systems of a society it takes a lot more than the popular uprising: it needs the expert planning, designing and implementing a process of change. In order to bring about the desired change in the aftermath of ousting a tyrant is extremely difficult. Only the presence and involvement of an international team of experts and activists could help bring about a well-designed, well-balanced, long-sustainable and progressive system of self-rule and a civil society that could help sustain such a system.